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Quarantine

 

 
Overview
 

Direction
 
 
 
 
 


 
Plot
 
 
 
 
 


 
Cinematography
 
 
 
 
 


 
Score
 
 
 
 
 


 
Acting
 
 
 
 
 


 
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Reviewer's Thoughts

Quarantine is by far the greatest modern-day horror movie I have seen to date. It defines “horror” and breathes life into a genre that has gone the way of shallow popcorn gore flicks and corny, noisy snoozers. Taking the approach of the 1st person camcorder view made popular by classics like The Blair Witch Project, […]

Posted October 15, 2008 by

 
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quarantineQuarantine is by far the greatest modern-day horror movie I have seen to date. It defines “horror” and breathes life into a genre that has gone the way of shallow popcorn gore flicks and corny, noisy snoozers.

Taking the approach of the 1st person camcorder view made popular by classics like The Blair Witch Project, Quarantine steps it up a notch and delivers. No worries my sea-sick friends, the camera is no longer in the hands of some amateur teenager like former movies of it’s kind, this movie places the camera in the hands of a professional. So what does that mean? Well it’s steady! Yes! A steady camera, yet we are never taken away from the fact that there is a guy behind it watching the horror along with you.

Without delving too much into the plot to ruin things for you future viewers, the basic synopsis is Angela Vidal (Jennifer Carpenter) is a television reporter who decides to do a story on Fire fighters and their daily routines. Wishing to accompany the heroes on a call, she is granted her wish when the men are summoned to help an old woman in an apartment building. Upon entering the building they find that the old woman is a bit more than sick and they are trapped within the building with no explanation as to why.

My only gripe with this movie is the same gripe I have with all camcorder movies… I think Diary of The Dead was the worst example of this but… when you see trouble and you are behind a camera… is it not logical to just drop the thing and fight? Well there are moments when cameraman Steve Harris would use the camera as a bludgeoning tool or he’d lay it down to administer an ass whipping to a zombie or two before returning to the camera once more. I would like to see a mix of 1st person camera shots and 3rd person in the next film like this… unlike the Blair Witch Project, the audience DOES realize it’s only a movie.

Firemen Jake (Jay Hernandez) and George Fletcher (Johnathon Schaech) do a good job hamming it up and acting their part, Jennifer Carpenter is a cutey as usual but as the horror intensifies her cuteness is replaced with an overly hysterical, freaked out screamer that had me wanting to reach into the screen and slap her one good time (metaphorically of course). As a whole the acting was decent, it followed the same formula that all of the “we are trapped together” movies seem to have… The typical players: You have the cute little innocent girl with a puppy, the lawyer type who thinks he knows it all, the scared housewife who never shuts up, the foreigners (insert stereotype here) and of course the brave tough guy. They are all in here.

You also have the standard zombie formula… infected stands there… infected bites an innocent… the innocent becomes a zombie. Now take that formula and place them into a crammed tight apartment building and you have a horrific cluster of confusion, violence and rabid drooling coupled with blood. Seeing this unfold from behind the lens of a camera, you are placed within the building as a victim moreso than an audience member. When a zombie lunges at the camera man, you want to jump out of your chair and hide behind it… when the camera pans, you bite your nails hoping that a figure won’t materialize within the parallax. This is some good horror folks, Quarantine is a must-see.

Lastly, I didn’t realize this was a remake of a Spanish horror film called Rec… in any event remake or non this is a breath of fresh air in my eyes. An actual horror movie that didn’t have long haired Japanese ghosts or cheesy CGI accompanied by alot of loud noise. A very spicy movie indeed.

[rating=8]


Greg Dragon

 
Cinephile and opinion writer, Greg Dragon has been a fan of movies since the 80's when Kung Fu theater was all the rage and Roger Moore was James Bond. Greg is the founder and lead critic of Spicy Movie Dogs. You can follow him on Twitter @Rafacus or on his Google+ account.