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300

 

 
Overview
 

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Plot
 
 
 
 
 


 
Cinematography
 
 
 
 
 


 
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Acting
 
 
 
 
 


 
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Reviewer's Thoughts

King Leonidas, reared and forged as a warrior and gleaned to perfection as a symbol of Sparta and her standards is the focus of Frank Miller’s 300. His tale is one of self sacrifice and unwavering loyalty, about 300 men who stood their ground before millions of invaders with the mantle of freedom as their […]

Posted March 9, 2007 by

 
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300King Leonidas, reared and forged as a warrior and gleaned to perfection as a symbol of Sparta and her standards is the focus of Frank Miller’s 300. His tale is one of self sacrifice and unwavering loyalty, about 300 men who stood their ground before millions of invaders with the mantle of freedom as their guide. Along the way we are treated to treacherous countrymen, beautiful yet powerfully strong women and unique cinematography to reflect Frank Miller’s style. It is the common tale of strength and honor, pride in martyrdom and hero worship that many young men of our generation look for in these epics. The Spartans are shown as warriors of demi-god caliber prowess contrasted to the dark Persians who appear to be more freak show than anything else. I won’t bore you with my feelings about this depiction of the Persian army but needless to say if this was anymore than a comic book exaggeration of history it would have annoyed me quite a bit. The Spartans are solid, like scantily clad track athletes and the Persians are horrific, pierced, rotten, whored out and inhuman. This dramatic contrast leaves no room for mistaking which team you should be rooting for as an audience member. The highlight of 300 has got to be the cinematography, with a heavy hitting soundtrack and a unique way of depicting the battles, this movie shines in it’s look over everything else.

Synopsis
The Persian king Xerxes is hell bent on conquering the world. Unlike Alexander who is depicted as a brave warlord for pursuing the same dream, Xerxes is shown to be a slaving, narcissistic God King with a mission to have everyone kneel before his throne. When his horde of Persians crash the beaches of Greece, King Leonidas is sought out to give in to the incoming horde or face the wrath of Persian arrows. In response to this threat, the king does the right thing by consulting with the lawmakers of Sparta and begging their aid in launching a counter strike against the foreign invaders. With corruption and bribery already poisoning the waters of his countrymen, Leonidas finds that the only support he will get in launching a campaign lies in the hearts of 300 Spartans, who like himself were raised with the hope of dying in honor to a worthy combatant. Sneaking from the city and into the night, the brave Leonidas and his host of 300 warriors take the fight to the Persians and shows the world the formidable fighting spirit of Sparta and the strategic genius in the Greek Phalanx.

Final Thoughts
Not since Braveheart has their been a sword/armor flic worthy of mention like 300. The music gets your heart pumping, the perfect shots of the mighty Leonidas in combat gets the blood flowing and the preaching of strength and honor drives itself into your soul. The overly dramatic speeches and deliveries of the actor’s prose adds to the comic book feeling even more and every line is a worthy quote. Lena Headey is delicious… as the strong, warrior-queen Gorgo she holds her own against the sniveling politicians who criticize her husband’s actions as he defends their honor on the battlefield. The sex scenes are hot, and realistic, very sexy while remaining tasteful… Queen Gorgo is our relative tender area of 300 to try and balance a very macho and hard film. But Queen Gorgo is far from tender, so the film remains practically a man’s movie, a fighting man’s movie and a reminder that glorious victory is nothing in comparison to a glorious death. This film will be a classic.

[rating=9]


Greg Dragon

 
Cinephile and opinion writer, Greg Dragon has been a fan of movies since the 80's when Kung Fu theater was all the rage and Roger Moore was James Bond. Greg is the founder and lead critic of Spicy Movie Dogs. You can follow him on Twitter @Rafacus or on his Google+ account.